whistleblower book tour

University Book Store, Seattle

PROGRAM: The event should run 60 minutes start-to-finish including 35-45 minute author talk and audience Q&A. Book signing follows. This event is an in conversation with Terry Tazioli. Book Title: Whistleblower at the CIA Author: Melvin Goodman Publisher: City Lights Publishing About the Book Melvin Goodman’s long career as a respected intelligence analyst at the…

CIA Whistleblower Talk Sponsored by FLVCS

Thursday, March 8, 2018, 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM Fogartyville Community Media and Arts Center (525 Kumquat Court) Buy Tickets Here: https://squareup.com/store/peace-education-and-action-center/ (Click Link then when it opens scroll down to Mel Goodman Event) Tickets: $15 adv/$20 door Chef Richard’s Kumquat Kitchen will be open. Melvin A. Goodman was a soviet analyst at the CIA…

Columbia, MD: Oakland Mills High School

Sunday Feb. 4, 2018 9.15 am Talk at the Oakland Mills High School (cafeteria) located at 9410 Kilimanjaro Road, Columbia, Maryland 21045. 

Chicago, IL: Seminary Co-op

Monday, January 8, 2018, 6pm Chicago, IL: Seminary Co-op In conversation with . . . Blog feature “Critical Reading” to do 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. Chicago, IL 60637 773.752.4381 Contact: Alexandra Houston  alex@semcoop.com

Recent News and Latest Book

Breaking the Addiction to Secrets and Secrecy

There is no question that the government must protect its sources and methods in the collection of intelligence. Regarding substance, however, I believe that, with the exception of details on weapons systems as well as on sensitive negotiations, there are few legitimate secrets and almost none that must remain classified for more than ten years at most. The secrecy that surrounded the Iran-Contra affair probably saved the Reagan presidency over the short term, but greater transparency would have prevented Iran-Contra from ever getting off the ground in the first place.

Harvard’s Kennedy School: Key Part Of The Military-Industrial Complex

Harvard’s Kennedy School’s denial of a fellowship to Kenneth Roth, the former head of Human Rights Watch, because of his criticism of Israeli policies in the West Bank and Gaza is only the latest example of the corporate role played by Harvard’s most prestigious think tank on public policy.  Roth, who has spent the last three decades at HRW defending human rights around the world, was offered a senior fellowship at the School’s Carr Center for Human Rights Policy.  It was quickly withdrawn.