University Book Store, Seattle

PROGRAM:
The event should run 60 minutes start-to-finish including 35-45 minute author talk and audience Q&A. Book signing follows. This event is an in conversation with Terry Tazioli.

Book Title: Whistleblower at the CIA
Author: Melvin Goodman
Publisher: City Lights Publishing

About the Book

Melvin Goodman’s long career as a respected intelligence analyst at the CIA, specializing in US/Soviet relations, ended abruptly. In 1990, after twenty-four years of service, Goodman resigned when he could no longer tolerate the corruption he witnessed at the highest levels of the Agency. In 1991 he went public, blowing the whistle on top-level officials and leading the opposition against the appointment of Robert Gates as CIA director. In the widely covered Senate hearings, Goodman charged that Gates and others had subverted “the process and the ethics of intelligence” by deliberately misinforming the White House about major world events and covert operations.

In this breathtaking expose, Goodman tells the whole story. Retracing his career with the Central Intelligence Agency, he presents a rare insider’s account of the inner workings of America’s intelligence community, and the corruption, intimidation, and misinformation that lead to disastrous foreign interventions. An invaluable and historic look into one of the most secretive and influential agencies of US government–and a wake-up call for the need to reform its practices.

 

About the Author

Melvin A. Goodman served as a senior analyst and Division Chief at the CIA from 1966 to 1990. An expert on U.S. relations with Russia, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Harper’s, and many others. He is author of six books on US intelligence and international security.

The event is finished.

On CounterPunch.org

Mel’s Analyses – Florida Veterans for Common Sense

Mel’s Analyses – Florida Veterans for Common Sense

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