Free Screening of Official Secrets

“Official Secrets uses the recent past to invite viewers to interrogate our present and, more specifically, what they’re willing to risk to prevent a disastrous future.”

The Washington Post

“The best movie ever made about how the Iraq War happened.”

The Intercept

Dear Friends,

Please join the Center for International Policy at Landmark’s E Street Cinema for a FREE screening of the based-on-a-true-story film Official Secrets which features CIP Senior Fellow Melvin Goodman. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion on the importance of whistleblowing today with Melvin Goodman and Kathleen McClellan. You can watch the trailer here.

Melvin Goodman is a Senior Fellow at the Center for International Policy and an adjunct professor of international relations at Johns Hopkins University. His 42-year government career included tours at the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of State, and the Department of Defense’s National War College, where he was a professor of international security.

Kathleen McClellan serves as National Security and Human Rights Deputy Director for the Whistleblower and Source Protection Program (WHISPeR) at ExposeFacts. She has represented whistleblowers from the National Security Agency, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, and Department of Homeland Security.

The event will begin at 6:00pm in Auditorium 1 at Landmark’s E Street Cinema [555 11th St NW, Washington DC 20004] on International Human Rights Day, Tuesday December 10.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited to 156, so please RSVP by emailing the number in your party as well as the names of each member of your party to rsvp@internationalpolicy.org.

We look forward to having you join us for this fun and timely event!

Our Contact Information

Center for International Policy
2000 M Street NW
Suite 720
Washington, DC 20036
202-232-3317
https://www.internationalpolicy.org

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