April 27, The WNDC Lunch Program “America’s Russian Problem: A New Chapter”

Click on image for event details or follow this link to register now: http://www.ciponline.org/get-involved/events/mel-goodman-on-panel-presentation-on-us-russian-relations

On April 27 at 1pm, as part of the Woman’s National Democratic Club’s monthly “US Role in a Changing World” series, I will be speaking at a lunchtime panel presentation “America’s Russian Problem: A New Chapter.”

Twenty-five years ago, the United States had an important strategic opportunity to remake its foreign policy because of the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union.  This opportunity has been largely squandered by the actions of the Clinton, Bush, and Obama administrations.  Now the Trump administration must deal with the issue in the wake of Russian involvement in the presidential election; worsening bilateral relations due to Putin’s actions in Ukraine and Syria; and the confusion created by a new national security team in Washington that has no obvious plan or policy. Meanwhile, important decisions must be taken regarding arms control and disarmament as well as policy in East and Central Europe. Today’s talk will speculate on where we go from here.

Schedule for lunch events:

11:45-12:15 reception-opportunity to mix with attendees;
12:15-1:00 sit-down lunch;
1-2 PM- program, leaving at least 15 minutes for Q and A.

Cost:
$25 –members;
$30-non-members;
$10 program only.

Information about the WNDC is on our website, www.democraticwoman.org.

WNDC is located in the historic Whittemore House on New Hampshire Ave NW at the corner of Q St.

 

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