What Did We Learn from Libya?

Melvin A. Goodman, senior fellow at the Center for International Policy, discusses the lessons of the Libya crisis to be learned from Hillary Clinton’s actions as secretary of state, and how Bernie Sanders has approached the issue as a presidential candidate.

Libya, Goodman explains, “was a major failure and a major disaster for U.S. foreign policy.” He takes on the question of the consequences of a “regime change” policy in the region, and weighs the rhetoric of the presidential campaign.

This is a second in a series of videos on OurFuture.org in which progressive experts examine key issues in the 2016 presidential race. Please share these videos on your social networks.

Originally published on Our Future

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